Driver beeping their car horn

What gets drivers honking? - Infographic

The car horn has been around for as long automobiles have existed. As far back as the 1800’s on some of the earliest incarnations, motorists had a choice of numerous signalling devices including bulb horns, whistles and bells. The bulb horn became popular in America in the early 1900’s, but soon people were calling for a more effective warning device that could be heard miles ahead.

by Andrew Segal 3rd October 2017

Manufacturer’s came up with a variety of solutions, however it was the Klaxon (from the Greek word klaxo – meaning ‘to shriek’), that became the template for horns used in cars today as it only needed to be touched once to create a warning sound, as opposed to be sounded continuously.

The horn is fundamentally a safety device but as drivers there are often other scenarios where we need to (or choose to) use it. Going by the letter of the law, some of these instances are in fact illegal, as the Highway Code says you may only use your horn when you are moving and need to warn others of your presence. It also states that horns cannot be used in built-up areas between 11.30pm and 7.00am. Fines of £30 can handed out on the spot (rising to £1000 if unpaid in time), but the reality is it’s very difficult for the authorities to enforce these laws.

All of this made us curious to find out from our GAP insurance database in which circumstances you give someone a honk. The top 10 reasons are presented in the infographic below:

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